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  • David Colvin

David Colvin

David Colvin

DAVID COLVIN

MBBS, FRACS
Shoulder and Knee Surgery, Sports Injuries

David Colvin trained in orthopaedic surgery in Perth, Western Australia and subsequently undertook Post Fellowship training in shoulder and knee surgery both in Australia and with the Arthroscopy Association of North America.

David’s specialty is knee and shoulder surgery and sports injuries.

David’s Professional Affiliations are:

Fellow Royal Australasian College of Surgeons

Australian Orthopaedic Association

Arthroscopy Association of North America

American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons

International Society of Shoulder and Knee Surgeons

Sports Medicine Australia

St John of God Hospital Subiaco

Affiliations - David Colvin

Affiliations - David Colvin

Consulting Rooms

SUBIACO


St John of God Medical Clinic
Suite 213
25 McCourt St, Subiaco WA 6008
Phone 08 9489 8788
Fax 08 9489 8787

MURDOCH


Wexford Medical Centre
Suite 13
3 Barry Marshall Pde, Murdoch, WA 6150
Phone 08 9489 8788
Fax 08 9489 8787

Operating Theatres

SUBIACO


St John of God Subiaco Hospital
12 Salvado Rd, Subiaco 6008
Phone 08 9382 6111

MURDOCH


St John of God Hospital
100 Murdoch Drive, Murdoch 6150
Phone 08 9366 1111

Procedures

Shoulder

Knee


Articles


RECENT ADVANCES IN ARTHOSCOPIC SURGERY

The term “minimally invasive surgery” is a buzzword in medicine at present. Many common procedures are now being performed using new techniques that allow smaller incisions, less tissue dissection and lower morbidity. This allows a shorter hospital stay, quicker recovery and a more cosmetic result.
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TREATMENT OF PATELLOFEMORAL PAIN

The patellofemoral joint refers to the kneecap (patella) and the groove it runs in at the front of the knee (trochlea). The quadriceps muscles on the front of the thigh connect to the top of the patella. It is then connected to the tibia (shin bone) by the patellar tendon. The point of attachment is a bone prominence called the tibial tuberosity.
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ACL RECONSTRUCTION GRAFT CHOICE

Once the decision has been made that cruciate ligament reconstruction is required, most people want to talk about the choice of graft. My first advice in this regard is, do not stress too much about the choice in graft as there are many other factors that will have much greater bearing on the success of surgery.
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OSTEOARTHRITIS UPDATE

What is osteoarthritis? Articular cartilage is the smooth surface lining found in all joints. It is remarkably similar to the layer of teflon on a non stick frying pan. It is approximately 2 to 3mm thick, just like a layer of teflon. Articular cartilage can be damaged by injury or by wear and tear and takes on an appearance not unlike the surface of an old teflon frying pan. This wear and tear process occurs in all joints. When it becomes severe it is called osteoarthritis.
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BICEPS TENDON TEAR AT THE SHOULDER

The biceps is the large muscle at the front of your arm. Its main function is in bending the elbow. It also has a minor function in rotating the forearm to bring the hand into a palm upward position (called supernation). There are several other muscles that perform both of these functions.
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SHOULDER IMPINGEMENT / ROTATOR CUFF TENDONITIS / SUBACROMIAL BURSITIS

The terms impingement, rotator cuff tendonitis, and subacromial bursitis, all refer to a spectrum of the same condition. The shoulder is one of the most complex joints in the human body. It is complex because it allows a range of motion greater than any other joint. The shoulder is made up of the shoulder socket (called the glenoid, which is part of the scapular or shoulder blade) and the humerus which is the upper bone of the arm. The collarbone or clavicle also contributes to the shoulder joint.
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SHOULDER INSTABILITY / DISLOCATION

The shoulder has the greatest range of motion of any joint in your body. Its role is to allow you to position your hand in space. The down side of having extreme movability is the reduced stability. The shoulder can be overtly unstable and dislocate as a single episode or repeatedly. Less obvious is shoulder subluxation where the ball is loose within the socket but does not actually dislocate. Once the shoulder has dislocated for the first time it is vulnerable to further episodes of dislocation. If it has dislocated on more than one occasion we call this chronic instability.
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FROZEN SHOULDER

Frozen shoulder (also known as adhesive capsulitis) is a disorder characterized by pain and stiffness in the shoulder. It affects about two percent of the general population. It is more common in women between the ages of 40 and 70 years. The causes of frozen shoulder are not fully understood. It usually develops spontaneously. The process involves thickening and contracture of the capsule surrounding the shoulder joint.
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SKIN HYPERSENSTIVITY

After an injury or operation nerves within the skin can sometimes become overly sensitive. Stimulation to the skin in that region of your body, such as touch or pressure, can feel unpleasant, oversensitive and even painful.You can reduce these feelings by deliberately bombarding the sensitive nerve endings with different stimuli.
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